Saturday, February 9, 2013

20 Hrs., 40 Min.

I've actually finished two books in my Goodreads challenge so far.  But, I'm going to review my second one first.  Partly because it's shorter and a stand alone book so it's easier for me to figure out how to write about it without giving anything away.  And, partly because I'm also linking up to Trifextra's weekend challenge with this book.

The book is 20 Hrs., 40 Min by Amelia Earhart.  The 33 word quote I chose for the Trifextra challenge is this:

“…on the flight I think two questions have been asked of me most frequently.  First: Was I afraid?  Second: What did I wear?  I’m sorry to be a disappointment in answering the first…”
 
I love the idea that these were the two most frequently asked questions upon Earhart's return from being the first woman to fly across the Atlantic Ocean.  By the way, she goes on to say she was not afraid on the flight.
 
The book is a quick, easy read.  From a literary stand point I didn't find much remarkable about it.  But, I don't think that is a fair way to judge the book.  Earhart's voice comes through clearly in her writing, so much so that she has become a person I would put on my list of famous people in history I wish I could meet.  She is straight forward in her telling of this part of her story and gives credit where credit is due.
 
Earhart wrote the book shortly after the flight was made.  She points out several times she was merely a passenger on this flight.  She is careful to make clear she felt the credit for the flight should be focused on Wilmer Stultz, the pilot, and Louis Gordon, the mechanic, who actually flew the plane.  Earhart came across to me as someone who was not looking for the fame but was willing to use it to advance one of her passions - aviation.
 
Interestingly, aviation was NOT Earhart's main love.  She, at heart, called herself a social worker.  She was working in a settlement house prior to Friendship's flight across the Atlantic and, once in England, her favorite part of the trip was visiting settlement houses in London.
 
Overall I enjoyed the book.  While some dispute how much of her fame was deserved and how much she merely capitalized on the work of others, after reading this, I think she was very aware of this balance.  Some of her fame came from the work of others and she acknowledged this.  Yet, Earhart also did many things to earn the fame in her own right, such as setting the female aviation altitude record at one point.

24 comments:

  1. I LOVE this!! I am so sick of people talking about Hillary Clinton's outfits and hair! We need to stop objectifying women. Nice quote!

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    1. The sad part is that it's been going on for so long I don't know that it is possible to change.

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  2. I have always had a healthy obsession with Earhart. I will read this for sure. Did you ever read "I Was Amelia Earhart"? It is fiction. I really liked it.

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    1. I haven't read that one. I'll have to check it out.

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  3. ahhh Amelia :) a bit of an enigma

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    1. She was at that. From the impression I get, she was certainly an interesting woman.

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  4. I know her experiences were interesting. Good 33 word choice.

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    1. I agree. When I have time, I am going to see what else she may have written about her experiences.

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  5. Earhart was, at heart, a free spirit. That's how I always think of her!

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    1. I do too. I wonder if that's a testament to how she was or if some of it is the romanticism of early flight and her involvement in that.

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  6. so funny to hear her irritation in knowing that no one would've publicly asked a man either of those questions - and, yet, she had no qualms about using her difference to her advantage

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    1. I know! Seriously, who cares what she wore??? Her willingness to use her femininity to her advantage was smart - she was able to be a very public voice making efforts to advance early aviation.

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  7. Such an interesting choice. I love how you shared with us your thoughts on the book (:

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    1. For whatever reason, that line out of the book really stood out to me. I am glad you enjoyed my thoughts on the book as well.

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  8. That quote is all kinds of awesome. It's getting one of my three votes, for sure. Great job!

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  9. I havent read this yet, but it's on my list.

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    1. Cool! It is a quick read, but well worth it.

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    1. She was in so many different ways beyond her contribution to early aviation, which is something many people don't realize about her.

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  11. Excellent choice! I've just added one more to my reading list. Thank you.

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    1. Thanks! It is a book I'd recommend to anyone interested in history, aviation, or just plain real life adventurers.

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  12. Fabulous-loved it:-)Great read-so inspiring.

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    1. Thanks! The book was really good. I felt like it gave me a feel for who she was.

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